NSW irrigators Peter and Jane Harris guilty of breaching water-take regulations

Two prominent New South Wales irrigators have been found guilty of illegally taking water for use on their farm near Brewarrina.

Key points:
  • Irrigators Peter and Jane Harris are found in breach of the approvals associated with the water licence for their farm
  • They will be sentenced on a date to be fixed; they have 28 days to appeal the decision
  • WaterNSW says the court action shows how serious it is about managing water resources

The NSW Land and Environment Court found that Peter and Jane Harris illegally extracted water for irrigation from the Barwon River during June 2016, contrary to a condition of their joint water use and supply approvals under the Water Management Act 2000.

www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2020-03-19/nsw-irrigators-guilty-of-water-take-regulations

The Country Hour 20/3/2020 with Dr Emma Carmody

www.abc.net.au Country Hour

Judgement:

www.caselaw.nsw.gov.au/decision

 

 

Have your say: Draft Water Sharing Plan for the NSW Great Artesian Basin Groundwater Sources 2020

The NSW Government Department of Industry Water has prepared a draft replacement plan and is seeking feedback from water users and other interested parties as part of the public exhibition phase.

The Water Sharing Plan is a regulatory plan under the Water Management Act 2000, and is in effect for a 10-year period. The purpose of the NSW Great Artesian Basin Water Sharing Plan is to set the rules that determine how water is to be shared between the environment and water users.

This Plan applies to the groundwater sources of the Great Artesian Basin (GAB). These groundwater resources are referred to as the:

  • Eastern Recharge Groundwater Source,
  • Southern Recharge Groundwater Source,
  • Surat Groundwater Source,
  • Warrego Groundwater Source, and
  • Central Groundwater Source.

NSW GAB WSP 2020

Join us at one of the information sessions to learn more about:

  • the draft NSW Great Artesian Basin Water Sharing Plan 2020
  • the proposed changes to the water sharing plan arrangements
  • how to make a submission

Public information sessions 

  • 2 March 2020, Moree Services Club, Moree, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm
  • 3 March 2020, Lightning Ridge RSL, Lightning Ridge, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm
  • 4 March 2020, Diggers on the Darling, Bourke, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm
  • 5 March 2020, Coonamble Bowling Club, Coonamble, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm

RSVP 

To attend the information session, please RSVP by email to water.relations@dpi.nsw.gov.au

NSW green light to irrigators to harvest rainfall angers downstream residents

 

The New South Wales government has given the green light to irrigation farmers in the north-west of the state to harvest the recent rainfall, pleasing some but causing anger in towns such as Menindee and Wilcannia and on the lower Darling where the river has not flowed for a year.

The lifting of the embargo for three days will be welcomed particularly by cotton farmers who have lobbied the NSW water minister, Melinda Pavey, warning that unless they are able to harvest the water their infrastructure will be damaged.

Water and Indigenous people: “I’m tired of being an afterthought”

The problems of water mismanagement go back a long way, but one thing is sure, building dams then praying for rain is not a rational solution. According to Kamilaroi water scientist, Bradley Moggridge, Indigenous knowledge-holders should be “front and centre” in decision making around water.

https://www.thefifthestate.com.au/urbanism/environment/water-and-indigenous-people-im-tired-of-being-an-afterthought/

Catchment curb could cap benefit of ‘outrageously expensive’ dam plan

By Peter Hannam

The benefits of the state government’s $1 billion dam-building plan will likely be limited by existing rules that cap the amount of water than can be taken from catchments within the Murray-Darling Basin.

The Murray-Darling Basin Authority – the body responsible for ensuring planning decisions made in the interests of the overall basin – said the proposed upgrade of the Wyangala Dam and the new Dungowan Dam would need to operate within the state’s existing water entitlement rules.

“New or expanded dams don’t create water, but rather intercept and store large volumes of water which can then be managed as regulated releases,” Phillip Glyde, the authority’s chief executive, told the Herald.

“The MDBA is required to ensure that state governments are using no more than the long-term annual average limit of water that can be taken from individual catchments within the Basin,” he said.

https://www.smh.com.au/environment/conservation/catchment-curb-could-cap-benefit-of-outrageously-expensive-dam-plan-20191014-p530l7.html

National Party MPs call for more dams as states invest in other solutions to Australia’s water crisis

ABC News 13/10/19 – Lucy Barbour

Dams have long been a part of the National Party psyche and its members believe they’re what their constituents want, expect and demand.

But dams are a tricky business. They are ecologically controversial and can take years to reach the building phase because of lengthy environmental approvals, land purchases and business cases.

And more often than not, dams in regional Australia do not provide value for money because they are designed to benefit agriculture.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-10-13/dams-and-other-solutions-to-drought-water-crisis-nationals-mps/11593394

World Rivers Day 22nd September 2019

“Rivers are the arteries of our planet; they are lifelines in the truest sense.”
~ Mark Angelo

What better day to get in a boat and clean the river, where we get our water from, than WORLD RIVERS DAY and CLEAN UP THE WORLD DAY.

World Rivers Day is a celebration of the world’s waterways. It highlights the many values of our rivers, strives to increase public awareness, and encourages the improved stewardship of all rivers around the world. Rivers in virtually every country face an array of threats, and only through our active involvement can we ensure their health in the years ahead.

Community groups in Dubbo NSW came together and took to the water, collecting 180kg of general rubbish, tyres, bikes and seven shopping trolleys from the Macquarie River, the source of 70% of the town’s drinking water.